Michigan Housing Vaccination Requirements

What do I need to do to get a Michigan Housing contract?
  • After U-M receives your enrollment deposit, we will send you an email with a link to the Michigan Housing application. If you’ve submitted your enrollment deposit and waited three weeks but have not received an email, write to housing@umich.edu. Make sure you include your U-M ID number.
  • Submit your Michigan Housing application as soon as possible.
  • Concurrently, you need to submit your information about your vaccination history. All U-M students residing in Michigan Housing on the Ann Arbor and Marygrove campuses are required to submit documentation showing whether or not they are vaccinated against the below six (6) diseases.
  • U-M students who are not vaccinated against these diseases must still submit documentation and may be asked to attest that they are not vaccinated and understand they may be subject to additional public health protocols should there be a public health need.
    • COVID-19
    • Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR)
    • Meningococcal (MenACWY)
    • Polio
    • Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap)
    • Varicella (chickenpox)

Last Updated: February 13, 2024

What are accepted sources of vaccination records?
An acceptable list of sources of vaccination records is below. Please ensure the documentation shows both your first and last name.
  • State-based immunization systems
  • County-based immunization systems
  • Health System Portal (MyChart)
  • Pediatrician's office records
  • Pharmacy records
  • Vaccination card or booklet
  • Country or Ministry of Health records

Last Updated: March 20, 2024

I know I received my routine vaccinations but I’m not sure how to find proof. What should I do?
Students vaccinated in Michigan are able to request a copy of their MCIR record showing their vaccination history. Students vaccinated outside of Michigan may be able to locate their records through their primary care physician or their state immunization information system. Many countries outside of the U.S. also have immunization information systems. International students are encouraged to check with their primary care providers or the country’s Ministry of Health. Students who are not able to obtain their vaccination records may complete an attestation as part of the vaccination reporting process. The attestation is part of the full form submission; no additional form is needed.

Last Updated: March 6, 2024

How is compliance determined in order to receive a Michigan Housing contract?
To be in compliance, you need to submit your information about your vaccination history, including whether you are unvaccinated, in the U-M Vaccination History Form through Vax Viewer. This form must be submitted in order for you to be in compliance. Records are verified in the order they are received. Early submission is highly encouraged. Due to the high volume of submissions, the vaccine verification team may need up to two weeks to review submissions. Please monitor your university email account; the verification team will reach out via email if additional information is required. You will be notified via email once your submission has been verified and you can also check your status in Vax Viewer.  

Last Updated: March 22, 2024

How long does the vaccine verification process take?
Records are verified in the order they are received. Early submission is highly encouraged. Due to the high volume of submissions, the vaccine verification team may need up to two weeks to review submissions. Students are advised to monitor their university email accounts; the verification team will reach out via email if additional information is required. Students will be notified via email once their submission has been verified and they can also check their status in Vax Viewer.

Last Updated: March 22, 2024

I am not fully vaccinated. What are my options?
Even if you are not fully vaccinated, you must still submit your information in the U-M Vaccination History Form through Vax Viewer. The form includes an attestation where you may state that you are not vaccinated and understand you may be subject to additional public health protocols should there be a public health need. Once you arrive on campus, you are encouraged to make an appointment at UHS to receive any missing vaccinations.

Last Updated: February 9, 2024

What meets the Tdap vaccine requirement?
A single dose Tdap after age 11 will meet the university’s requirements. If you have only received a Td vaccine (which protects against tetanus and diphtheria but not pertussis, also known as whooping cough), you either need to obtain a Tdap vaccine or complete the relevant attestation within the vaccination reporting form. If you complete the attestation, consider receiving your full Tdap vaccine at UHS once you are on campus.

Last Updated: May 15, 2023

What meets the MenACWY vaccine requirement?
MenACWY, or meningococcal conjugate, protects against meningococcal disease caused by serogroups A, C, W, and Y. A different meningococcal vaccine, meningitis B or meningococcal B, is available that can help protect against serogroup B. If documentation of your meningitis vaccine does not clearly indicate it is MenACWY or meningococcal conjugate, you will not be considered fully vaccinated for meningitis A, C, W, and Y serotypes. Common brand names of the MenACWY vaccine in the US are Menactra, Menveo, and MenQuadfi.

Last Updated: May 15, 2023

Is there a blank immunization form I can ask my physician's office to complete?
Yes. Please download this form and ask your physician's office to complete it for you.

Last Updated: April 10, 2024

My vaccination records are not in English. Do I need to provide a translated copy?
No, you do not need to provide a translated copy. The vaccine verification team has resources available to translate records as needed.

Last Updated: May 2, 2023

Does this policy apply to Housing staff or just students?
Only U-M students living in Michigan Housing on the Ann Arbor and Marygrove campuses fall under the policy requirements.

Last Updated: February 20, 2023

What additional public health measures may be required for students who have not submitted proof of vaccination?
Students who have not submitted proof of vaccination against COVID-19 or the other required immunizations may be subject to masking, testing, quarantine, or other disease prevention measures, should there be a public health need. Minimizing infectious disease exposure, spread, and disruption in Michigan Housing is essential to keeping our community safe.

Last Updated: April 5, 2023

Can I use another method for submitting my vaccination or exemption information to U-M?
No. At this time, the only channel for submitting vaccination and exemption information is via the secure self-reporting forms.

Last Updated: June 14, 2021

If I am a post-doc or research fellow, does the vaccination reporting policy apply to me?
No. Post-docs and research fellows are considered university employees rather than students so you do not need to submit your vaccination records, even if you live in Michigan Housing.

Last Updated: February 16, 2024

Where do I go if I have more questions?
  • The Health Response Call Center serves the campus community by connecting them to U-M public-health resources and support, and answering questions related to vaccination information submission and verification.  Hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Please call 734-936-7000 or email vaccineverification@umich.edu. Note: vaccine submission will not be accepted through this email. Vaccine information must be submitted through Vax Viewer (accessed via Wolverine Access - COVID-19 & Health Response).
  • Students with questions regarding vaccination policy compliance, exemptions and postponements, please reach out to vaccinecompliance@umich.edu.
  • For other questions about Michigan Housing, please email housing@umich.edu.
  • Employees with COVID-related HR questions, including vaccination policy compliance, exemptions, and postponements, please email: COVID-19HR@umich.edu.
  • For questions related to international students, please visit the International Center.
  • Policy questions can be sent to healthresponse@umich.edu.

Last Updated: August 1, 2023

U-M Health and Safety Policies

What is the University of Michigan's vaccination policy?
All U-M students residing in Michigan Housing on the Ann Arbor and Marygrove campuses are required to submit documentation showing whether or not they are vaccinated against the below six (6) diseases.
  • COVID-19
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR)
  • Meningococcal (MenACWY)
  • Polio
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap)
  • Varicella (chicken pox)
U-M students who are not vaccinated against these diseases may be asked to submit an attestation that states that they are not vaccinated and understand they may be subject to additional public health protocols should there be a public health need. The requirements in this policy are in addition to other vaccination requirements that may be applicable to faculty, staff, and students by their school, college, unit or third-party partners.

Last Updated: July 28, 2023

How do I provide documentation of my immunizations?
You can submit this information Vax Viewer (accessed via Wolverine Access - COVID-19 & Health Response). Students vaccinated in Michigan are able to request a copy of their MCIR record showing their vaccination history. Students vaccinated outside of Michigan may be able to locate their records through their primary care physician or their state immunization information system. Many countries outside of the U.S. also have immunization information systems. International students are encouraged to check with their primary care providers or the country’s Ministry of Health.

Last Updated: October 31, 2023

Is our community safe without a universitywide vaccination mandate?
Yes. Our community has a high level of vaccination and immunity from previous infection. Additionally, other efforts to combat COVID-19 will continue:
  • Get the most up-to-date COVID-19 vaccine recommended by the CDC. You may still report your COVID-19 vaccination to the university if you would like to do so.
  • The University Health Service has maintained vital infrastructure to provide prompt evaluation and testing of symptomatic students.
  • Our public health response team has the tools and systems in place to identify, monitor and respond to multiple infectious diseases, including through wastewater surveillance, testing and other data sources.

Last Updated: November 1, 2023

Do UM-Dearborn and UM-Flint require COVID-19 vaccinations?
UM-Dearborn and UM-Flint strongly encourage, but do not require, that all members of their campus communities are up to date with their COVID-19 vaccination.

Last Updated: February 20, 2023

Does Michigan Medicine require COVID-19 vaccinations?
Michigan Medicine employees are strongly encouraged but are not required to stay up to date on their COVID-19 vaccination.

Last Updated: November 1, 2023

What other vaccination policies are in place (i.e. the medical, dental, nursing, or pharmacy schools and colleges, etc)?
Some schools, units, programs or third-party partners will have their own policies in place, such as vaccinations required for travel to certain international destinations or requirements for healthcare or field placements.

Last Updated: April 28, 2023

Who has access to vaccination and exemption information?
Individually identifiable information may be shared as required by law, and with university officials, public health officials, and external service providers that support U-M COVID-19 response efforts. When information is shared with service providers, we have contractual agreements to require such service providers to keep your personal information secure and confidential, and do not allow them to use or share personal information for any purpose other than providing services on the university’s behalf. For more information, see the Privacy Policy for COVID-19 Vaccination and Exemption Self-Reporting.

Last Updated: August 4, 2021

How is vaccination and exemption information protected?
Student self-reported vaccination and medical exemption information is not regulated by the Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). For students, this information is regulated by FERPA. The University of Michigan takes appropriate measures to ensure the security and confidentiality of student records and personal human resources information.

Last Updated: August 4, 2021

Can I receive immunizations through UHS?
Yes, UHS offers a full range of immunizations.

Last Updated: February 20, 2023

Where can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?
There are a number of places to find vaccination opportunities. You can use Vaccines.gov to find a location offering the COVID-19 vaccine near you, then call or visit their website to make an appointment. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services also provides information, by county, on available vaccines and how to make an appointment. Other options include:

Last Updated: February 16, 2023

Are the COVID-19 vaccinations safe?
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention adults and children may have some side effects from a COVID-19 vaccine, including pain, redness or swelling at the injection site, tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, fever and nausea. Serious side effects are rare, but may occur. More info is available here. Students, faculty and staff from all three campuses and Michigan Medicine can speak with advisers ready to answer questions about the COVID-19 vaccine and its safety. Advisers will not offer medical advice or address issues related to human resources or university policy.
  • Students: Call University Health Service and ask to speak with a nurse for COVID vaccine information. The phone number is 734-764-8320.
  • Employees: Speak with a trained adviser at Occupational Health Services by phone on weekdays from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. The phone number is 734-764-8021, and callers should select prompt No. 2.

Last Updated: July 11, 2023

Do I need to pay or have insurance to get vaccinated?
Vaccinations are often covered by health insurance but you should check that the place where you’re getting vaccinated is in network for your insurance. If you don’t have insurance, you should be able to get vaccines at your local health department or other locations. UHS, local pharmacies, and other sites offer COVID-19 vaccinations. Vaccines.gov is also a good resource. For general vaccination pricing information, see the UHS immunizations webpage.

Last Updated: May 10, 2023

Can I get the COVID-19 vaccine at the same time as other vaccines?
Yes. COVID-19 vaccines and other vaccines may be administered without regard to timing. This includes simultaneous administration of COVID-19 vaccines and other vaccines on the same day, as well as co-administration within 14 days.

Last Updated: February 16, 2023

COVID-19 Basics, Testing, and Isolation

How do I isolate?
If you have respiratory illness symptoms (fever, coughing, sore throat, etc.), you should stay home and away from others until symptoms improve and no fever has been present (without the use of fever-reducing medication) for at least 24 hours.
If you test positive for COVID-19, report your positive test result, unless you tested through University Health Service, so that your results can be shared with the U-M Department of Environment, Health & Safety (UHS test results are automatically shared with EHS). EHS will contact you to discuss your isolation and care options. More information is available on the Care & Isolation page.

Last Updated: March 4, 2024

What is a close contact?
A close contact is defined by CDC as "someone who was less than 6 feet away from an infected person (laboratory-confirmed or a clinical diagnosis) for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period (for example, three separate 5-minute exposures for a total of 15 minutes). An infected person can spread the virus that causes COVID-19 starting 2 days before they have any symptoms (or, for people without symptoms, 2 days before the positive specimen collection date)."

Last Updated: January 31, 2023

What is case investigation and how is it done?
Case investigation is utilized to collect epidemiological data in order to reduce the spread of COVID-19.  Case investigators team call COVID-19 positive individuals to gather that data.  In addition, case investigators are providing guidance and encouraging individuals to inform their close contacts of exposures and to get tested accordingly.  The teams are currently focused on students and main campus employees to provide education and resources to properly isolate. Referrals to isolation housing are made if necessary.

Last Updated: August 3, 2022

What prevention measures should I take before, during and after traveling?
It’s recommended that all travelers follow public health prevention strategies to reduce the spread of COVID-19:
  • Delay traveling internationally until you are up to date on COVID-19 vaccinations.
  • Get vaccinated or tested per CDC guidance.
  • Wear a mask, especially in crowded areas.
  • Practice social distancing.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, or hand sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid travel if ill.
  • Check for travel restrictions and entry requirements for your final destination. To determine travel regulations and entry requirements for international locations, visit the COVID-19 Country Specific Information page on the U.S. Embassy site of the destination country.
  • Follow U-M policy and country-specific requirements for international University of Michigan Related Travel (UMRT). Locate your country on Global Michigan to determine travel eligibility and requirements.

Last Updated: February 2, 2022

COVID-19 symptoms and spread

What are the symptoms and how is it spread?

Symptoms may be flu-like, ranging from mild to serious, and include:
  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Muscle pain
  • Loss of taste or smell
COVID-19 is spread mainly through close contact from person to person. People without symptoms can spread the virus. More information on how the virus spreads is available from the CDC.

Last Updated: May 10, 2022

How do I prevent the spread of COVID-19?
The CDC advises that the best way to protect against infection is to get vaccinated and avoid being exposed to COVID-19. Here are actions to help prevent the spread of all respiratory viruses:
  • Get vaccinated against COVID-19, including any additional recommended boosters.
  • Wear a face covering when around others.
  • Get tested before attending social activities. Free PCR and rapid antigen tests are available on campus.
  • Get tested after close contact exposures, and be sure to wear a mask for a full 10 days.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

Last Updated: May 10, 2022

I've been exposed to COVID-19; what should I do?
Monitor yourself for symptoms and take extra precautions (e.g., masking, physical distancing, testing) when around others for five days.

Last Updated: March 4, 2024

I’m feeling sick with respiratory illness symptoms; what should I do?
If you have respiratory illness symptoms (fever, coughing, sore throat, etc.), you should stay home and away from others until symptoms improve and no fever has been present (without the use of fever-reducing medication) for at least 24 hours. If you test positive for COVID-19, see additional guidance here.

Last Updated: March 4, 2024

I’ve tested positive for COVID-19; what should I do?
Report your positive test result, unless you tested through University Health Service, so that your results can be shared with the U-M Department of Environment, Health & Safety (UHS test results are automatically shared with EHS). EHS will contact you to discuss your isolation and care options. More information is available on the Care & Isolation page.

Last Updated: August 15, 2023

What should be done if someone tests positive for COVID-19 (in the classroom, at an event, etc.)?
  • Individuals who test positive should follow care and isolation guidance outlined here.
  • When an individual tests positive from a U-M testing source or reports a positive test result from an off-campus testing source to the university, EHS will contact them with guidance.
  • Note: The individual may not have been infectious while around others.
  • If faculty members, departments or units choose to notify others of a positive case, they should not identify individuals by name. Students, faculty and staff — regardless of vaccination status — no longer need to quarantine following a close contact exposure but should self-monitor for symptoms.
  • If positive in the classroom, it is the individual's responsibility to notify the instructor that they are not able to attend class due to illness. Faculty should continue to provide academic support to all students during this period. The Dean of Students Office can provide support to the student.

Last Updated: March 4, 2024

I've tested positive using a rapid antigen test; do I need a confirmation PCR test?
No. There is no need to get a confirming PCR test following a positive result from a rapid antigen test. You should isolate and follow the guidance outlined hereReport your positive test result here.

Last Updated: January 24, 2022

Does my U-M health insurance plan cover COVID-19 testing, treatment, or vaccination?
  • Costs for COVID-19 medical services shifted to normal rates and requirements, effective May 12, 2023. This means members covered by U-M health plans will pay regular coinsurance or copays for these services, including charges for using out-of-network providers.
  • Also effective May 12, over-the-counter rapid antigen COVID-19 tests are not covered by U-M’s prescription drug plan. Members have through May 2024 to submit reimbursement claims to Magellan Rx for eligible, previously purchased test kits.
  • COVID-19 treatment drugs Paxlovid and its generics, nirmatrelvir/ritonavir, will continue to be covered by the U-M prescription drug plan, with no member cost-share as long as the U.S. government pays for these products. 
  • COVID-19 vaccinations will continue to be covered at no cost to members.

Last Updated: May 12, 2023